photography

Raptors All Around: Photographing the Hawks and Falcons of Providence, R.I.

If wildness can stop being (just) out there and start being (also) in here, if it can start being as humane as it is natural, then perhaps we can get on with the unending task of struggling to live rightly in the world—not just in the garden, not just in the wilderness, but in the home that encompasses them both

–William Cronon, “The Trouble With Wilderness

The search for wildness in a city brings people to parks, to rivers, to little tracts of untouched forest left standing on a hill. It’s there if you look for it. It is why birders carry binoculars and why my cousin, Peter Green, carries a camera. No matter how hard people try, we can’t build cities that can keep the wilderness out.

How did you start noticing and taking pictures of birds of prey in Providence?

Shortly after moving to Providence, I pointed binoculars at a pigeon perched high on the downtown bank tower and immediately saw it was not a pigeon—it was something eating a pigeon. I looked online, identified it as a peregrine falcon, and learned how wildlife officials had installed a nest box on the building to encourage the recovery of this once-endangered species. From then on, whenever possible, I eagerly watched the falcons from my window.

I soon began to notice pigeon carcasses downtown with all of their feathers pulled out, and suspected the falcons must be hunting here, so I made sure to always have my camera with me. One day as it started to snow, I finally saw a large raptor standing on the ground in the park next to the bus station. I quickly got down in the dirt and took some of the best pictures of my life. I couldn’t believe this wild animal was right here downtown in the city. And, to my surprise, it was not a peregrine falcon—it was a red-tailed hawk.  (more…)

Canada's Haida Gwaii

The Safest Way To Transport Oil Is To Leave It Underground

Hannah Griffin writes:

Dear Ken Layne,

Below is a link to a photo I took on Canada’s Haida Gwaii last spring.
Haida Gwaii is a archipelago 8 hours from mainland Canada, and if the
Enbridge’s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline becomes a reality,
oil-filled tankers will be moving through their backyard. On countless
properties on Haida Gwaii are strongly worded signs like this one
communicating the distress the residents feel over this situation.

Thank you for your time,
Hannah Griffin

Thank you for the photograph, which is very timely today.